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Flags, Symbols & Currency of Aruba

Aruba’s Flag (BANDERA) is light blue in color and features two narrow, horizontal, yellow stripes across the lower portion  and a red, four-pointed star outlined in white in the upper hoist-side corner.

Aruba’s Flag (BANDERA) was officially adopted on March 18, 1976, and its style was retained after it became an autonomous region of the Netherlands. The flag is light blue (‘Larkspur’) in color and features two narrow, horizontal, yellow stripes (‘Bunting Yellow’) across the lower portion and a red, four-pointed star outlined in white (‘Union Flag red’) in the upper hoist-side corner. The flag was designed by vexillologist – Whitney Smith.

The light blue color symbolizes the Caribbean waters and skies and; was intentionally chosen to match the shade used in the United Nations flag. The ‘four-pointed white-fimbriated red star’ represents Aruba - its red soil and white sand beaches that ring it; as well as the pride of Arubans in their struggle for liberty for their island. The four points symbolize the four major languages (Papiamento, Dutch, Spanish, and English) as well as the four points of a compass, to indicate that its inhabitants come from all over the world. The two yellow stripes represent the island's two main "industries", the flow of tourists to the sun-drenched beaches and the flow of minerals from the earth. The color yellow also represents the flora of Aruba that bloom yellow. The flag’s width-to-length ratio is 2:3.

History of Aruba Flag

Being a part of the Netherlands Antilles, Aruba began to actively seek independence or autonomy in the early 1970s. As a part of that, in 1976, Aruban leaders decided to develop a national flag.  The national flag was first hoisted on March 18, 1976, and its style was retained after it became an autonomous region of the Netherlands.

Symbols of Aruba

National Coat of Arms of Aruba

National Coat of Arms of Aruba

The Coat of Arms of Aruba was designed in Amsterdam in 1955 and has been the national symbol of Aruba ever since. It displays a lion sitting atop a shield with laurel branches surrounding the lower half. The lion symbolizes power and generosity, and the laurel branches are traditional symbols of peace and friendship. The shield is divided into four sections by a white cross which represents devotion and faith. In the first quarter of the shield is the island's first important export -- the aloe plant. In the second quarter is Aruba's most recognizable and second-highest hill, Hooiberg, which represents Aruba rising out of the sea. The third quarter displays hands shaking, which is symbolic of Aruba's good relations with the world. Finally, the fourth quarter contains a cogwheel, representative of industry.

National Anthem

  • Anthem Title: “Aruba Dushi Tera” (“Aruba Sweet Land”/ “Aruba Lovely Country”)
  • Music Composer: Rufo Wever
  • Lyricist: Juan Chabaya Lampe
  • Date of Adoption: March 18, 1976.

The National Anthem of Aruba is “Aruba Dushi Tera”. The song is a waltz and was composed Rufo Wever with Juan Chabaya Lampe as its lyricist. The last verse of the anthem was written by Hubert Booi. The National Anthem was officially adopted on March 18, 1976.

Aruba patria aprecia

nos cuna venera

Chikito y simpel bo por ta

pero si respeta.

Chorus:

O, Aruba, dushi tera

nos baranca tan stima

Nos amor p’abo t’asina grandi

cu n’tin nada pa kibr'e, cu'n tin nada pa kibr'e.

Bo playanan tan admira

cu palma tur dorna

Bo escudo y bandera ta

orguyo di nos tur!

Chorus

Grandeza di bo pueblo ta

su gran cordialidad

Cu Dios por guia y conserva

su amor pa libertad!

Chorus

Aruba appreciated native land

our venerated cradle

you may be small and simple

but yet you are respected.

Chorus:

Oh Aruba sweet land

our boulder so beloved

our love for you is so strong

that nothing can destroy it. (repeat)

Your beaches so much admired

with palm trees all adorned

your coat of arms and flag

are a pride to us all!

Chorus

The greatness of your people

is their grand cordiality

that God will guide and conserve

their love for liberty!

Chorus

The Currency of Aruba is the Aruban florin

The Aruban florin (AWG) is currently the official currency of Aruba. It was introduced in 1986 replacing the Netherlands Antillean guilder.  The Centrale Bank van Aruba (the CBA) brought the Aruban florin into circulation and it was pegged to the US dollar at a rate of Afl. 1.79 = US$ 1.00; an exchange rate that has remained unchanged since then.

Coins

In 1986, coins were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 25, and 50 cents and 1 and 2½ florin. the 5-florin banknote was later replaced by a square coin and the 2½-florin coin was removed from circulation. The 5-florin coin, which was previously made of an alloy of copper and other metals, was replaced in 2005 with a round gold-coloured coin. All coins are made in nickel-bonded steel. Commonly called “yotin” the 50-cent is the only remaining square-shaped coin.

On the back of each coin is a profile view of the current head of state of the Kingdom of Netherlands.

Banknotes

The Central Bank of Aruba introduced banknotes in denominations of 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 florin in 1986. They were updated in a more colorful style, as designed by Aruban artist Evelino Fingal and was introduced in 1990. A 500 florin note was added in 1993.  In 2003, a new series of prints were added to the existing banknotes. In 2019, a new series of banknotes in the denominations of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 florin were added. This new series of notes is based on the theme “Life in Aruba” and features the flora, fauna, cultural heritage, monuments, and landmarks of Aruba. The 2003 series of banknotes are no longer in circulation.

Aruban florin Banknotes

Aruba 50 Florin 2019 Banknotes
Aruba 50 Florin 2019 Banknotes

Aruban florin Coins

Aruba florin 1 coin with King Willem-Alexander
Aruba florin 1 coin with King Willem-Alexander

Historical Currencies of Aruba

Being a part of the Netherlands Antilles, the Dutch guilder was used in Aruba. It was subdivided into 20 stuiver. In 1794, the Curacao real was minted and circulated across Netherlands Antilles and the Dutch guilder was officially discontinued in Aruba. The Curacao real circulated in Aruba from 1799-1828. After the short gap, the guilder was reintroduced in 1828. During WWII, the Curacao guilder’s peg to the Dutch guilder was broken and a new peg to the US dollars was introduced. The Curacao guilder was officially renamed the Netherlands Antillean guilder in 1952. Aruba separated from Netherlands Antilles in 1986 and introduced its currency – the Aruban florin.

Dutch guilder Banknote

Frans Hals, Dutch painter. Portrait from Netherlands 10 Dutch Guilder 1968 Frans Hals, Dutch painter. Portrait from Netherlands on 10 Dutch Guilder 1968 banknote
Frans Hals, Dutch painter. Portrait from Netherlands 10 Dutch Guilder 1968 Frans Hals, Dutch painter. Portrait from Netherlands on 10 Dutch Guilder 1968 banknote

Dutch guilder Coin

2,5 dutch guilder coin (1978)
2,5 dutch guilder coin (1978)

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