Society

The Safest States in the US

A look at the safest U.S. states as determined by multi-factorial analyses. The safest are found in the New England region of the Northeast United States.

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There may be no worse feeling than feeling insecure or in danger, whether that be a fear for one’s life, financial trouble, or lying in the path of a storm. With a number of safety criteria in mind, however, the New England region of the United States appears idyllic. Most of New England's urban and rural areas alike have low crime rates. Furthermore, the region is not as prone to many types of natural disasters as are other areas of the U.S., it is home to some of the nation's finest educational institutions, and sees some of the highest median incomes and quality of life measures of anywhere else in the country.

The safest states to live in the United States are characterized by rates of violence and crime well below national norms. The states are listed based on their violent crime rate. All data comes from the Federal Bureau of Investigation

The Safest States in the US - New England Leads the Way

Maine - 121 per 100,000

By measure of violent crime rate, Maine is the safest state in the US. Maine is a sparsely populated state and is the most northern state in New England, known for its rugged coastline on the Atlantic Ocean. The violent crime rate of Maine is 121 per 100,000 residents. The largest city in Maine is Portland while its capital city is Augusta.

Vermont - 165.8 per 100,000

Vermont, New Hampshire's neighbor to the west, is the second safest state in the United States. Vermont's violent crime rate is 165.8 per 100,000. Vermont is the second least populated states in the union, after only Wyoming. It is known for its pristine green hills and largely untouched wilderness.

New Hampshire - 198.7 per 100,000

New Hampshire has the third lowest violent crime rate in the US, at 198.7 per 100,000 people. Residents of New Hampshire enjoy the active outdoor lifestyle that New England has to offer, as well as four distinct seasons throughout the year. New Hampshire was called the best state for small businesses.

Virginia - 208.3 per 100,000

Virginia, the first state on the list outside of New England, has a violent crime rate of 198.7 per 100,000. This makes it the fourth safest state in the country by this measure. Virginia has a population of 8.47 million and is known for its proximity to Washington, DC. Notably, the District of Columbia actually has the highest crime rate in the country.

Kentucky - 225.8 per 100,000

The violent crime rate in Kentucky is only 225.9 per 100,000 people – well below the country's average. Kentucky has a population of around 4.4 million and is located on the cusp of the country's southern region.



Environments Conducive to General Safety

Socioeconomic indicators point to the safest states' high marks in the survey. The residents in the safest states in the country typically earn at or above the national median income level of $52,250. The survey also revealed that the members of the populations of these states generally have better financial security than do most other Americans living elsewhere. While poverty still exists, the rates of financial insufficiency within these states are considerably lower than those of the national average. Educational level and achievements also play a large role in placing these states among the safest in the nation. Factors like good educational attainment often correlate to lessened crime and this points to the fact that the safest states may be getting even safer as higher educational levels become more and more prevalent within them.

What are the Safest States in the United States?

The states with the lowest crime rates include New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, and Connecticut.

The United States Ranked By Safety

RankStateCrime Rate (Annual Per 100,000 People)
1Maine121
2Vermont165.8
3New Hampshire 198.7
4Virginia208.2
5Kentucky225.8
6Idaho226.4
7Connecticut 228
8New Jersey228.8
9Rhode Island232.2
10Wyoming237.5
11Minnesota238.3
12Utah238.9
13Iowa239.4
14Hawaii250.6
15North Dakota281.3
16Oregon281.8
17Mississippi 285.7
18Ohio297.5
19Washington304.5
20Nebraska305.9
21Pennsylvania313.3
22Wisconsin319.9
23West Virginia350.7
24New York356.7
25Georgia357.2
26Massachusetts358
27North Carolina363.7
28Colorado368.1
29Montana377.1
30United States Average394
31Indiana399
32Florida408
33Kansas413
34South Dakota433.6
35Illinois438.8
36Texas438.9
37California449.3
38Michigan450
39Delaware 453.4
40Oklahoma456.2
41Maryland500.2
42South Carolina506.2
43Arizona508
44Alabama524.2
45Missouri530.3
46Arkansas 554.9
47Nevada555.9
48Louisiana 557
49Tennessee651.5
50New Mexico783.5
51Alaska829
52District of Columbia1004.9

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