Stowe, Vermont

The State of Vermont, located in the northeastern New England region of the United States, is administratively divided into 14 counties. Situated in Lamoille County is the historic New England town of Stowe. The town was first established about 258 years ago by New Hampshire’s colonial governor, Benning Wentworth. The town of Stowe resembles a European alpine mountain resort. Three families from Sweden brought the sport of skiing to Stowe and it soon caught on with the locals.

Map of Vermont. Stowe is centrally located in the northern portion of the state.

Nicknamed the "Ski Capital of the East," Stowe is situated in a lovely valley surrounded by the Green Mountains in the west and the Worcester Range in the east. With a total area of 188.5 km2, Stowe is Vermont’s second-largest town. Mount Mansfield is Vermont’s highest peak, which rises to an elevation of 1,340m and is accessible for skiing at the Stowe Mountains Resort. Moss Glen Falls, at 38.1 m high, is the tallest waterfall in Vermont that is located near the town of Stowe.

Stowe’s economy is mostly based on tourism with some of the best skiing and snowboarding on the east coast. Quaint Vermont inns, eclectic shops, and fresh mountain air lure visitors throughout the year. The historic town also serves as a hotspot for hikers and nature lovers during the fall foliage season when the tree-covered mountains burst with color, making for great hiking, biking, and photo ops.

Attractions

Gold Brook Covered Bridge/Emily’s Bridge

Gold Brook Covered Bridge/Emily's Bridge, Stowe, Vermont.

Situated in the southeastern part of Stowe in the Stowe Hollow area is The Gold Brook Covered Bridge, locally known as “Emily’s Bridge”. It is the last of Stowe’s 10 original covered bridges that were constructed in 1844 by John W. Smith. According to a local legend, Emily’s Bridge is said to be haunted. 

Trapp Family Lodge

Trapp Family Lodge, Stowe, Vermont. 

This 10.11 km2 resort has breathtaking mountain views and Austrian-style guest accommodation. The resort is run by the Trapps, the family who inspired the classic musical movie The Sound of Music, settling here after they escaped from Austria during World War II. One can enjoy the rich woodwork, lofty rafters, stone fireplaces, and very personal service in this resort. The Trapp Family Lodge also provides various recreational activities for outdoor lovers, including cross country skiing, hiking, and mountain biking. The resort serves as a perfect place to relax, offering guests wine tastings, horse-drawn carriage rides, and yoga.

Stowe Recreation Path

Scenery of the Stowe Recreation Path, Stowe, Vermont.

The Stowe Recreation Path is an 8.5 km recreation trail whose construction was completed in 1989 at an estimated total cost of $680,000. This flat greenway meanders through the Stowe town along the western branch of the Little River, stretching from the village downtown to the Topnotch Resort. Also known as the Stowe Bike Path, the trail was originally conceived as a walking path to direct visitors around town. Today the path is a favorite spot for hikers, walkers, runners, bikers, and rollerbladers. The trail also offers beautiful views of the woods and mountains, Vermont villages below in the valleys, and crystal clear mountain streams.

Smugglers’ Notch State Park & Recreation Area

Smugglers' Notch State Park, Vermont.

Formerly, a smuggling route into Canada, Smugglers’ Notch is a beautiful mountain pass through the Green Mountains and is now a popular state park and ski resort area. Smuggler's Notch also offers great snowboarding and cross-country ski experiences and is most widely known for its miles of ski slopes from expert to black diamond. Once the snow melts, visitors enjoy the rush of flying downhill on the alpine slide. Beyond these Vermont ski slopes, the park offers great biking, hiking, picnicking, and rock climbing. Smugglers' Notch embodies the seclusion and natural beauty of the mountains, surrounded by impressive thousand-foot cliffs. The Smugglers’ Notch Resort is situated on the northern side of the Sterling Range and the northeastern side of the Smugglers’ Notch pass.

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