Boston, Massachusetts

Boston is one of the oldest cities in the United States. It is the capital and largest city of the state of Massachusetts, as well as the largest metropolis in New England. Boston boasts a vibrant and diverse cultural life. Its status as a cultural center is largely based on the major museums that constitute its inheritance.

Geography Of Boston

Boston
View of Boston on the Massachusetts Bay.

Boston is a city in the northeastern United States that serves as the capital of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the seat of Suffolk County. It has an area of 46 square miles and is located on Massachusetts Bay, a branch of the Atlantic Ocean. The city itself is exceptionally tiny for a big metropolis, with water covering more than one-fourth of the entire area (including a piece of the Charles River, Boston Harbor, and a bit of the Atlantic).

Climate Of Boston

The closeness of Boston to water causes fog and humidity. Rain often falls in the spring and summer, while snow frequently falls in the winter, making Boston one of the wettest cities in the country. Compared to other cities in the northeastern United States, the Atlantic Ocean winds maintain Boston's climate comparatively temperate. Those same Atlantic gusts, though, contribute to Boston's ranking as one of the windiest cities in the country.

Population And Economy In Boston

Irish Famine Memorial in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. Editorial credit: 2p2play / Shutterstock.com

With a 2020 population of 696,959, Boston is the largest city in Massachusetts and the twenty-first largest city in the United States. Boston's population has increased by 12.85 % from the 2010 census, which reported a population of 617,594. Higher education, health care, and finance all play important roles in the Boston economy. The average annual salary in Boston is $34,770. Over the last year, the city's job market has grown by 4.3%. Future job growth is expected to be 42.5 % over the next ten years, greater than the US average of 33.5 %.

Attractions In Boston, Massachusetts

1. Freedom Trail

The Freedom Trail is America's first historic walking tour, and it includes 16 of Boston's most significant Revolutionary War locations. The 2.5-mile course begins in Boston Common, the country's oldest park, and is designated by a red paint line. Guests will pass through the Old State House, where British soldiers opened fire on a mob of protesting Bostonians during the Boston Massacre.

2. Quincy Market

It was built in the Greek Revival style, which Thomas Jefferson introduced to America as a departure from Georgian design, and was named for Boston mayor Josiah Quincy. Quincy Market is well-known for its architectural style as well as the cuisine provided in its more than 20 restaurants and 40 kiosks.

Boston
Skyline of Boston, Massachusetts, with Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market at dusk.

3. Boston Common

Boston Common, America's oldest public park, was purchased by the city's Puritan founders in 1634. The park, which was originally utilized as a cow field, has also been the setting of numerous significant events. At the onset of the Revolutionary War, the British utilized the site as a camp.

4. Fenway Park

Since 1912, Fenway Park has served as the home of the Boston Red Sox baseball team, and it is one of the city's most revered landmarks. The park is also a must-see for baseball fans, as it is America's oldest major-league ballpark that is still in use.

George Washington Monument at Public Garden in Boston, Massachusetts.
George Washington Monument at Public Garden in Boston, Massachusetts.

5. The New England Aquarium

It is located on the Central Wharf and within walking distance of the Rose Kennedy Greenway. It has a variety of sea life displays, including exotic jellyfish and stingrays and playful seals and penguins.

6. Museum Of Fine Arts

It is well-known for its fantastic Art of the Americas collection, which comprises everything from pre-Columbian and colonial-era Art to contemporary pieces. Its extensive galleries also include outstanding Asian and Persian fine arts, ancient Egyptian mummies, masterpieces by European painters, and many more.

7. Museum Of Sciences

The Museum of Science has a dizzying assortment of interactive displays. It is located in Science Park, a stretch of land that straddles the Charles River and includes everything from hands-on activities and live science displays to a small zoo, planetarium, and IMAX cinema for people to enjoy.

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