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Wales

Wales Geography

Wales is hilly, and for the most part, a mountainous country, dominated by the Cambrians, central and north, and by the Brecon Beacons of the south. Along its eastern border with England, wide river valleys cover the land.

Within the Cambrians, small mountain ranges include the Aran and Arennig, Glyderau, Moelwynion and Tryfan. Here, more than a dozen peaks exceed 914 meters (3,000 ft.). The highest mountain in Wales, Mt. Snowdon, rises to 1,085 meters (3,560 ft).

In the northeast, just above the Dee River, the Clwydian Hills are a short 20-mile range of undulating hill and moorland.

The Brecon Beacons in the south and southeast are a series of forested rolling hills, low mountains and valleys, that include the Black Mountains. The area is famous for deep caves, gorges and waterfalls.

Sandy beaches extend along much of the northern and western coastlines of Wales. Sea cliffs front the Llyn (Lleyn) Peninsula, as well as the southwestern coastline.

In the far south, scattered coastal cliffs, rolling hills and wide stretches of sandy beach extend from Pembrook to the western edges of Cardiff.

Rugged cliffs, and very wide sandy beaches and dunes front what is considered Wales' most beautiful landscape, the Gower Peninsula.

The land is replete with small lakes, rivers and streams. A few of the larger rivers include the Dee, Severn, Tywi, Usk and Wye.

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This page was last updated on April 7, 2017.