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What Is Synchronicity?

According to the concept of synchronicity, all events are “meaningful coincidences” if they happen without a causal relationship, but are still somehow related to one another.

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Synchronicity is a concept first used by Carl Jung, a Swiss psychologist. According to the concept of synchronicity, all events are “meaningful coincidences” if they happen without a causal relationship, but are still somehow related to one another. It is a way to describe that everything in our universe is connected and happens for a reason.

It implies that a collective unconscious of humankind exists and that all events that are happening around the world at the same time are somehow tied to one another. Jung first started talking about this concept in the 1920s but did not really develop it until 1951. He uses synchronicity when trying to argue that paranormal existences and events are real. 

The Meaning Behind Coincidences

Coincidences constantly happen in many different forms, but we most often prescribe them to random chance. However, synchronicity tries to find the hidden meaning behind the coincidences and the ways they are all connected. 

Jung published his paper titled “Synchronicity – An Acausal Connecting Principle” in 1952, and there he tried explaining the concept further. He claimed that events are connected by causality, but it is possible that they also may be connected in meaning. He believed that events that are connected by meaning don’t need to be explained in terms of causality. 

Is Everything Connected?

It is worth noting that Jung believed in various supernatural phenomena. Some of those include UFOs, telekinesis and other psychic powers, alchemy, and astrology. One of his biggest obsessions was numerology, which is a discipline that tries to find hidden meanings behind numbers and try to predict life events in individuals through numbers. 

One of Jung's biggest obsessions was numerology
One of Jung's biggest obsessions was numerology.

Synchronicity is not well defined by Jung, and it is worth noting that he coined the concept itself during a period when he had a mental illness. That was during the early 1900s, and Jung became obsessed with the idea of everything in the universe being connected. Following that train of thought, he started believing that a mutual unconscious of humankind exists. When all of this was presented together, he concluded that all events happening in the world are somehow mysteriously connected. 

The Curious Case Of The Flock Of Birds

One example of synchronicity that often gets mentioned when talking about Jung is the one he himself would often mention. He noted how one of his patients remembered that a flock of birds gathered in front of her house before her mother and grandmother died. One day her husband went to see the doctor about his heart problems, and he died on the way back. Before he left the house, however, the wife saw a flock of birds in front of the house. This made her believe that the appearance of birds is somehow connected to people dying.

Of course, this occurrence can be explained easily as just a coincidence, which it most likely was. Another thing worth noting when talking about synchronicity is confirmation bias - people tend to notice things that confirm their beliefs much easier, which can explain the bird situation. The scientific world largely sees synchronicities as pure coincidences and tries to explain most of them through laws of statistics.

Synchronicity is, therefore, often considered to be pseudoscience because it is impossible to test it. It does have a certain appeal because it gives a small amount of meaning to our universe, which can seem so random at times. 

Did Jung believe in supernatural phenomena?

Jung believed in various supernatural phenomena. Some of those include UFOs, telekinesis and other psychic powers, alchemy, astrology, and numerology.

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