Winter Olympics

Curling

Curling began as an outdoor winter sport in early 16th century Scotland using flat-bottomed stones on frozen ponds. Scottish immigrants brought the game to Canada in the early 19th century before spreading to the United States, Switzerland, and Sweden. Curling was included as a demonstration event at the first-ever Winter Olympics in 1924, as well as in 1932, 1988, and 1992. Men and Women’s Curling was introduced as an Olympic event at the 1998 Winter Olympics Games held in Nagano, Japan. The PyeongChange 2018 Winter Olympic Games will also feature a Mixed Doubles event with teams composed of one man and one woman. Today’s competitions are held indoors on special curling rinks using granite curling rocks. The winners are determined by the most points at the end of the game. Points are accumulated by the closest stones to the target, called a house, after each end, when both teams have thrown all their stones.

Mixed Doubles

In the Mixed Doubles event, being featured for the first time at PyeongChang 2018, teams are composed of one man and one woman, and include 8 ends. Each team throws 5 stones per end.

Rank Country
1 Norway
2 Canada
3 Switzerland

Men's Curling

In Men’s Curling, each team is composed of 4 men, and include 10 ends. Each team alternates to throw eight stones per end. Curling was introduced as an Olympic sport at the 1998 Winter Olympics Games held in Nagano, Japan.

Rank Country
1 Switzerland
2 United States Of America
3 Sweden

Women's Curling

In Women’s Curling, each team is composed of 4 men, and include 10 ends. Each team alternates to throw eight stones per end. Curling was introduced as an Olympic sport at the 1998 Winter Olympics Games held in Nagano, Japan.
Rank Country
1 Japan
2 Sweden
3 South Korea

Updates will be coming as events are completed. Stay tuned!

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