Where Did The Most Shocking Nazi Human Experiments Happen?

By Antonia Čirjak on April 21 2020 in Society

These experiments took place in concentration camps mostly during the 1940s, during the duration of World War II and the Holocaust. Image credit: Jose Herrero Perez / Shutterstock.com
These experiments took place in concentration camps mostly during the 1940s, during the duration of World War II and the Holocaust. Image credit: Jose Herrero Perez / Shutterstock.com
  • During the duration of World War II, many people of mostly Jewish descent in Nazi Germany were forced to partake in gruesome experiments.
  • The most famous experiments were the ones performed on twin children, under the leadership of Josef Mengele.
  • Other experiments included malaria, poison gas, and many other tools for torture and left hundreds of thousands of people mutilated, disabled, or dead.

Nazi Germany was a place of horror. For several years, prisoners were subject to gruesome torture and experiments, the likes of which were unseen anywhere else. Experiments were conducted even on children, which makes everything even more horrifying.

These experiments took place in concentration camps mostly during the 1940s, during the duration of World War II and the Holocaust. The victims of these experiments were mostly from target populations, and they included Romani, ethnic Poles, and Jews from all over Europe. 

The Experiments Of Horror

The prisoners were forced to participate in these experiments by Nazi physicians and their assistants. No one volunteered willingly, so all of these procedures can be considered torture, medical torture, to be exact. The majority of the experiments had horrifying results that included death, disfigurement, permanent disability, and trauma.

The most prominent concentration camp where these experiments were conducted was Auschwitz, under the direction of Eduard Wirths. The prisoners were forced to take part in hazardous experiments with the goal of helping German soldiers in combat, and to develop new weaponry. 

The Horrific Experiments On Twins

The Nazi concentration camps were famous for the experiments they performed on little children. The most famous ones among those were the experiments on twin children. The goal of these experiments was to supposedly show the similarities and differences in the genetics of twins. They also tried to unnaturally manipulate the human body through them. Josef Mengele was the leader of these experiments. He performed them on 1,500 pairs of twins who were imprisoned at Auschwitz.

Josef Mengele was the leader of these experiments. He performed them on 1,500 pairs of twins who were imprisoned at Auschwitz.
Josef Mengele performed experiments on 1,500 pairs of twins who were imprisoned at Auschwitz.

Only about 200 of them managed to survive these awful experiments. Some of the gruesome things the Nazi researchers did to the children were injecting different dyes into their eyes to change their eye color and trying to sew the twins together. They went so far in their obsession that if one twin were close to dying during the experiment, they would kill the other one immediately and compare their bodies.

Other Nazi Human Experiments

While the experiments on twins are arguably the most well known, the experimentation of Nazi physicians did not stop there. They also experimented with bone, nerve, and muscle transplantations. They would remove body parts from one person without using anesthesia and try to attach them to a different person.

Many people died, and those that survived were permanently disabled or mutilated. Other experiments include the freezing of prisoners, infecting prisoners with malaria, and the experiments including mustard gas. The sterilization and fertility experiments were especially gruesome as well, with 300,000 people left sterilized after World War II.

People responsible for these crimes were put on trial at the well-known Doctor’s Trial, and once it was completed, it led to the development of the Nuremberg Code of medical ethics. The Nazi doctors that were put on trial tried arguing that these experiments were needed for the military, which would justify them in a way. However, this defense was thankfully rejected, as it should have been, especially since a lot of the experiments were performed on children.

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