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Can Antibiotics Treat The Coronavirus Disease?

Our fight against the novel coronavirus continues, and many of you might be wondering if antibiotics can help us get rid of the disease faster. Antibiotics do not help against COVID-19 because it is a virus. Antibiotics only help against bacteria.

Our fight against the novel coronavirus continues, and many of you might be wondering if antibiotics can help us get rid of the disease faster. Antibiotics do not help against COVID-19 because it is a virus. Antibiotics only help against bacteria.

Antibiotics should not be used for treatment or prevention of the novel coronavirus. There is a possibility of you receiving antibiotics if you get hospitalized because of the COVID-19 coronavirus. However, this is done to prevent bacterial co-infection from other sources. It does not help with the coronavirus whatsoever.

Do We Have A Medicine That Works?

We still do not have specific medicine that medical experts recommend for the treatment of the COVID-19 coronavirus. People that are infected will still receive proper medical care and should stay in the hospital, or if they have mild symptoms stay in house isolation. The doctors will explain how they need to behave and what exactly to do to get better.

People with a severe case of the illness are receiving treatment in the hospital and are getting advanced supportive care. Certain treatments are still under investigation, but those need to be thoroughly tested through clinical trials. With the efforts of medical experts throughout the world, hopefully, this research is accelerated, and we find a solution to the COVID-19 pandemic faster. 

Is There Treatment That Helps?

Certain methods of treatment can help with the coronavirus, even if we currently do not have a cure that works 100% of the time. The doctors do not recommend any antiviral medication. However, the treatment should be approached from the perspective of trying to relieve symptoms. This is why some of the medication that is advised if you are suffering from the COVID-19 coronavirus includes pain relievers like ibuprofen or different cough syrups.

It is important to take enough fluids and rest as much as possible. Recovery at home is recommended for people with mild symptoms of the disease. You may get specific instructions on how to monitor your condition from your doctor. It is important you follow those. The main reason you should follow these instructions is that you do not spread the illness to other people.

Certain methods of treatment can help with the coronavirus, even if we currently do not have a cure that works 100% of the time.
Certain methods of treatment can help with the coronavirus, even if we currently do not have a cure that works 100% of the time.

This is why isolation is essential. If you are positive for COVID-19, you should isolate yourself from your family, friends, and even pets. Despite antibiotics not helping, by doing this, we can successfully defeat this pandemic.

Is Malaria Drug Helpful?

There are a lot of reports saying that the drug for malaria, hydroxychloroquine, is able to cure the novel coronavirus. This is not completely true. While the drug did help a small number of patients in China, it did not cure the disease. The drug only sped up the recovery. Even though this means we are making progress, being careful is still extremely important.

The way this drug managed to help people suffering from the COVID-19 coronavirus is that it got rid of their fever, cough, and pneumonia much faster. It also prevented the disease from becoming more severe. All of this is promising, but still, a lot more research is necessary before we can completely be sure that medication works with no side effects.

Medical experts are still not entirely sure how this drug works in helping with the coronavirus. This news might excite many of you, and it should, to an extent. However, the fight against this pandemic is still not over, and until we have a definitive cure for it, it is crucial to stay at home and follow the rules.

About the Author

Antonia is a sociologist and an anglicist by education, but a writer and a behavior enthusiast by inclination. If she's not writing, editing or reading, you can usually find her snuggling with her huge dog or being obsessed with a new true-crime podcast. She also has a (questionably) healthy appreciation for avocados and Seinfeld.

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