World Facts

10 Shocking Archaeological Discoveries Of Our Time

Underneath the surface of our planet, many stories from ancient history unfold. Sometimes discoveries happen by accident, and archeologists, or even just regular people, find artifacts of different cultures buried deep.

Underneath the surface of our planet, many stories from ancient history unfold. Sometimes discoveries happen by accident, and archeologists, or even just regular people, find artifacts of different cultures buried deep. Relatively speaking, a lot of developments happened already, but here are the ten recent archaeological findings that continue to speak the stories untold. 

10. Kill Jesus, Build Streets? OK.

The street found in Jerusalem suggests how Pontius invested a lot of resources into the construction of the road.

Pontius Pilate is probably the most notorious villain you can find in the Bible, responsible for the death of Jesus Christ. Turns out, after the 2019 archaeological find that he was not that bad all the time. The street found in Jerusalem suggests how Pontius invested a lot of resources into the construction of the road. This goes against the stories that represent him as a corrupt person who took money from sacred treasures and took down everyone who opposed him.

9. Stonehenge In Extremadura

The prehistoric monument of Stonehenge near Salisbury, England. Credit: achinthamb / Shutterstock.com

The Spanish Stonehenge was initially found in 1926 by Hugo Obermaier, a German archeologist. One extraordinary feature of this site is that it can only be accessed if the waters of the Valdecañas Reservoir are down. There are close to 150 monolith stones in the Dolem de Guadalperal, and all of them are more than 7,000 years old.

8. How Old Are You? 110 Million Years?

CANELA, RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL - JUN 03, 2016: Armoured dinosaur Nodosaur at Vale dos dinossauros (Valley of the Dinosaurs Park). Credit: Silvia Vieira / Shutterstock.com

You are such a dinosaur! In 2011, that is precisely what came up back into the light of day. Paleontologists had the opportunity to identify a perfectly fossilized body of a nodosaur. Usually, they work with bones only, but this time, the flesh, the body armor, the scaled skin - it was all practically intact.

After analysis, it was determined how this nodosaur was a giant plant-eater, weighing around 2,500 (1100 kg) pounds and measuring 18 feet (5.5 m) long. You can see this beautiful specimen in the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology if you are ever in Alberta, Canada

7. The Wall

The Great wall of China maybe has found a new competitor in the Iranian wall?

It is exciting for archeologists to find something ancient, even more so if the creator is unknown.  In 2019, a 71-mile long (115 km) wall was discovered in the mountains of western Iran. This impressive structure contains an estimated 35 million cubic feet (1 million cubic meters) of stone. The reasons why the wall was created, or who put it there are still unclear. Close to 2,500 years old, this massive wall has two possible creators: the Parthians or the Sassanians, both empires that populated area around the time. 

6. Jaws 2002

In 2002, on Mount Carmel in Israel, a human jawbone surprised a freshman student.

The importance of this finding was so great that it was kept a secret for more than 15 years. In 2002, on Mount Carmel in Israel, a human jawbone surprised a freshman student. This fossil was proof of how people migrated from Africa earlier than it was assumed before. Some artifacts and the jawbone are estimated to be 250,000 years old.

5. Elena’s Discovery

Metallic Panel depicting Achilles in his chariot during the Trojan War in the Achilleion palace, on Corfu island, Greece. Ccredit: ducu59us / Shutterstock.com

Elena Korka started her quest to find the lost city of Tenea in 1984. Finally, in 2018 the city appeared underground. Located in southern Greece, this site is home to a town that Trojans created after the Trojan War. What is both relevant and impressive is the fact that the whole city was built by people who were prisoners of war. Scientists estimate that Tenea had a population of around 10,000 people back in 1300 BCE. 

4. Terracotta Warriors, Assemble!

Xi'an, China - July 22, 2014: Pit one of the tombs of the Terracota Army. Credit: RPBaiao / Shutterstock.com

The ancient tomb of the First Emperor of China appeared in 1974. The tomb of Qin Shi Huang is a spectacular site as it holds thousands of different sculptures made from a material called terracotta. This gorgeous historic display holds more than 8,000 terracotta soldiers that are there to serve their emperor, even in the afterlife. There are also 130 chariots, with 500 sculptures of horses pulling them, along with other figures that are not strictly military. 

3. Young King Of The Valley

The entrance of the Tutankhamen's tomb, in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt.

The people of ancient Egypt sure did like to create a luxurious final resting place. More so for their pharaohs. When Howard Carter started digging in the Valley of Kings, in 1922, he had no idea a perfectly preserved tomb of pharaoh Tutankhamun would emerge. On the west side of the river Nile, Carter and his team found the grave of the pharaoh that died when he was just a teen, and his tomb was filled with extraordinary objects. 

2. Sealed For Eternity

Karnak temple in Luxor. Credit: Dmytro Ogir / Shutterstock.com

Close to 3000 years old, these mummies were found in another type of polis - necropolis. In the ‘’city of the dead’’, located in Luxor, Egypt, archaeologists unearthed 30 sealed wooden coffins. They were all in shock in 2019, when they realized the so-called ‘’cachette of the priests’’ were in a greatly preserved state.

1. Megalopolis Of The Bronze Age

Israel flag above the old city of Jerusalem, Israel.

This site was discovered in 1977 in Israel. The En Ensur digging location is home to a huge city from the early Bronze age. It is estimated that more than 6,000 people lived in this megalopolis. This was massive for that time, as we are talking about a period that was around 3000 years BCE. In En Ensur, archaeologists dug up endless pieces of pottery, various tools, and even a vast temple, with a ritual stone basin preserved inside. 

Who started the quest to find the lost city of Tenea in 1984?

Elena Korka started her quest to find the lost city of Tenea in 1984.

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