10 Reasons Why Vaccines Are So Important

By Victoria Simpson on April 29 2020 in Society

Vaccines save lives, time, and money. Photo by CDC on Unsplash
Vaccines save lives, time, and money. Photo by CDC on Unsplash
  • Vaccines prevent many deadly diseases.
  • Vaccines have been proven to be safe to take, unless you have an allergy to the ingredients, which the vast majority of people do not.
  • Many vaccines are made in chicken eggs.

The topic of vaccines is alway guaranteed to strike up a robust debate. If you have enough people in the room, someone is likely to be on the other side of the fence

Amazingly, some people still feel vaccines are dangerous to receive, even though science has produced numerous studies to show that, for almost everyone, they are a potential life-saving tool. Here are ten reasons why vaccines are such an important part of our societies today. 

10. They protect you from going blind

About one or two of every 1,000 children who are not vaccinated and get the measles will die. Photo by CDC on Unsplash

The measles is a horrible beast. Sure, you can fall ill with it and survive, many people have. The measles can also be damaging and deadly however, which is a good reason to be vaccinated against it. According to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about one or two of every 1,000 children who are not vaccinated and get the measles will die from it. 

Those who do not die from the measles, but get it, risk suffering from long-term vision problems and going blind, among other complications.

9. They protect you from going deaf

The mumps is thought to be the most common cause of unilateral acquired sensorineural deafness in children. Photo by CDC on Unsplash

If you fall sick with the mumps, another sickness that you can easily be vaccinated for,  you can go deaf. In fact, according to the NCBI, the mumps is thought to be the most common cause of unilateral acquired sensorineural deafness in children. The deafness happens suddenly, and it is often profound and complete. You need not experience this if you are vaccinated against the mumps.

8. They protect your ability to walk

People who suffer from polio can get an infected spinal cord. Image credit: www.rotarygbi.org

Polio is another disease that used to be a childhood disease that caused parents to lose sleep, but now there is has a vaccine. People who suffer from polio can get an infected spinal cord. When this happens, they can experience paralysis. Polio often leaves sufferers with impaired walking, permanent muscle pain, and weakness. It can even result in death.

7. Vaccines can lower your chances of dying from the flu

The CDC estimates that between 130 and 1200 children have died from the flu each year in the U.S. Photo by CDC on Unsplash

Studies have shown that children who receive their yearly flu shots have a much greater chance of surviving a serious bout of seasonal flu. The CDC estimates that between 130 and 1200 children have died from the flu each year in the U.S. since 2010.

6. Vaccines can prevent your jaw from swelling shut for so long you die

Lockjaw can be deadly because it hinders a person's ability to eat and drink. Image credit: www.dovemed.com

This sounds as awful as it is. Lockjaw, also known as tetanus, is a bacterial disease that you can get from something as simple as scraping your hand on a rusty nail. It causes muscle spasms that make it hard for patients to open their jaws.

If infected, immediate medical help is needed. Patients often need to go into a coma as medical teams assist in waiting until your body can fight the infection off, which can take months. Lockjaw can be deadly because without help you cannot eat or drink. A vaccine can prevent you from getting this, however.

5. They help people with compromised immune systems

Getting vaccinated helps build up herd immunity. Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When you get vaccinated, it also helps to protect others who can not be vaccinated. Some people can not receive vaccines because they are too young, they may have a condition like severe allergies that prevents them from getting immunized, or they can not have the shots because their immune system is compromised. 

When you get vaccinated, you prevent these vulnerable people from coming into contact with the deadly diseases on this list. You can no longer carry them to them. This is called herd immunity. The more people who are immunized in the group, the more protected are the weak.

4. They prevent you from scarring your face for life

Smallpox is highly contagious and causes death in up to 30% of people who are infected by the disease. www.nzherald.co.nz

Sounds nice, doesn’t it? Not really. Smallpox is an illness that causes small “pox” on your skin while it is infecting you. It is highly contagious and causes death in up to 30% of people who get it.

Needless to say, this disease is devastating. It can cause you to go blind, and to have permanent deep scarring on your skin, all over your body. There is a vaccine for it now.

3. They can prevent you from damaging your lungs for life

The whooping cough vaccine has saved countless lives. Image credit: blogs.cdc.gov

Whooping cough is an infection that causes a severe cough. It is a respiratory infection that used to be a childhood disease. Infection with it can cause permanent damage to your lungs, but thankfully we have a vaccine. 

2. They save lives and time

When you are vaccinated you no longer need worry about falling sick for weeks or months on end. Photo by CDC on Unsplash

It is easy to see how vaccines now save millions of lives. They have been made to protect us from some of nature’s nastiest natural weapons. Getting vaccinated saves the medical world and society at large lives and time. When you are vaccinated, you no longer need to worry about falling sick for weeks or months on end. You won't need around the clock medical care as you battle it out against an illness that can now easily be prevented.

1. They make a stronger society

Vaccines make a society stronger. Photo by CDC on Unsplash

Plainly put, vaccines are also good for business. That is not the primary reason why they are good to get, but vaccines make a society stronger as they can make the economy run more smoothly. Families no longer need to take time off work to care for children who are fighting for their lives against the diseases in this list. Life can be hard enough, and vaccines can make it easier.  

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