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New York landforms

New York is dominated by mountains, all part of the Appalachian Mountain system that extends on into Vermont, New Hampshire and southern Canada.

Much of southwestern New York is covered by the lower ranges of the Allegheny Plateau, while the Adirondack and Catskill mountains cover the eastern third.

The massive Adirondack Mountains are New York's major landform. In this heavily forested area the highest point is located, Mt. Marcy at 5,344 ft.

New York has many significant lakes including the Finger Lakes chain; Lake Champlain forming its natural border with Vermont, and Lake George and Oneida Lake.

The state has almost 300 miles of combined frontage along the Great Lakes of Erie and Ontario. In addition, the Saint Lawrence River (seaway), forms part of the natural border with Canada.

Niagara Falls is a series of waterfalls located on the border between the United States and Canada. The system includes three separate waterfalls: the Horseshoe Falls (or Canadian Falls), the American Falls, and the smaller, adjacent Bridal Veil Falls.

The Hudson, Genesee and Mohawk are the most significant in-state rivers. The Delaware River forms part of its southern border with Pennsylvania.

The man-made Erie Canal links the waters of Lake Erie in the west to the Hudson River in the east. An engineering marvel when it was built, some then called it the 'Eighth Wonder of the World.'

For a dramatic look at the topography of New York, view this map.