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Manitoba

Manitoba Description

In 1872, the Dominion Lands Act passed, encouraging settlement of the Prairie Provinces by granting land rights to farmers.

wheatAfter the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1885, the Canadian provinces were linked sea-to-sea, resulting in major growth in Manitoba as new cities and towns were created. The railway also made it easier for exporting wheat, which had become Manitoba's cash crop.

One of the major crises the province faced in its early years was the Manitoba School Question. In 1890, legislation was passed creating a single public school system and funding ceased for both the Protestant and Catholic schools. The language of education in the new public schools was to be English. The opposition claimed this was in direct violation of the Manitoba Act.

In 1896, the Liberal Party leader won the election and negotiated a compromise allowing limited religious education in the public schools and providing for education in languages other than English under certain conditions.

Controversy again arose 1985 when The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that all of Manitoba's laws, written only in English, were to be translated to French within three years.

Manitoba Today

Manitoba faces a few major issues in the 21st century. Debate over offering services in the French language continues. The Province's debt has risen due to increased public services created by the government, without raising taxes significantly.

However, visitors from around the world travel to Manitoba for its many family activities and a myriad of activities, during their Canadian vacation.

With four distinct seasons of sunshine, beautiful natural landscapes, beluga whale watching, and northern lights, the great outdoors is a favorite for nature lovers.

Not to be missed are the cities of Churchill, the polar bear capital of the world, and Winnipeg, the largest city and capital is well known for cultural events, museums and natural beauty.

This page was last updated on July 12, 2016.