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Malaysia Geography

The country of Malaysia consists of the Peninsular Malaysia, which is part of mainland Southeast Asia, and the states of Sabah and Sarawak (east Malaysia) on the northern edges of the island of Borneo.

In essence, the coastal plains here (in some areas rather wide) rise gently into hills and mountains, all covered by dense rain forests.

Countrywide, elevations average between 3,500 to 6,000 feet, with the major exception being Malaysia's highest point, Mt. Kinabalu, at 13,451 ft. (4,100 m) in the State of Sabah.

The lowest point of the country is the South China Sea at 0 m. Off the coastlines of Malaysia are hundreds of very small islands (dots on a sea of blue).

Running along the peninsula are numerous caves, carved out by water eroding limestone, with the Mulu Caves in East Malaysia being the largest in the world.

Over two dozen rivers of size flow from the mountains, with the Pahang, Rajang and Sugut being the most significant.

There are only two natural lakes within Malaysia's borders: Bera Lake and Tasik Chini. Created in 1985, Kenyir Lake is an artificial lake that is said to be the largest in the world, covering some 100 sq miles (260 sq km).

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This page was last updated on April 7, 2017.