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Indonesia

President Sukarno sought to restore and shift the country back into a democracy in 1966, however, the Communist Party of Indonesia destroyed his efforts, and Sukarno was forced to transfer power to General Suharto.

During the period of military dominance, hundreds of thousands of citizens were killed or imprisoned, and civil unrest was prevalent throughout Indonesia.

A period of financial crisis gripped much of Asia in 1997, hitting Indonesia the hardest, and consequently jeopardizing Suharto's presidency. In addition to the economic trouble, a severe drought, complete with massive forest fires, spread throughout Indonesia.

Protests loomed as the parliament granted Suharto a new term, and ultimately flared into the Indonesian Revolution of 1998. Weakened, Suharto stepped down from power, and was replaced by Jusuf Habibie.

In 2004, Indonesia moved forward with the strengthening of its democratic processes, and the first direct presidential elections took place. However, a period of political and economic instability, social unrest, corruption, and terrorism slowed progress, however.

Some citizens in the outer-reaches of the country still demand more freedom, and that struggle continues today within the democratic process, and not on the battlefields of the past.

This tropical country and its many islands are one of the most stunning destinations on our planet, but terrorism attacks in Bali and other areas of the country in the early and mid-2000s have stifled some of the country's tourism.

The major Tsunami of December, 2004 severely damaged most of the northern reaches of Sumatra, and there's still an apprehensive feeling in the air for both residents and visitors alike.

About Indonesia

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This page was last updated on April 7, 2017.