Environment

Native Reptiles Of Indonesia

Indonesia's many endemic reptiles include Komodo Dragons, Sulawesi Bloodsuckers, and Sulawesi Forest Turtles.

Indonesia, being comprised of 17,000 islands, is home to an abundance of fauna. Numerous reptile species abound in Indonesia’s territories, some of which are endemic to these habitats. The many endemic reptiles include Komodo Dragons, Sulawesi Bloodsuckers, and Sulawesi Forest Turtles. These and other native reptiles of Indonesia are looked at below.

Native Reptiles Of Indonesia

Sulawesi Forest Turtles (Leucocephalon yuwonoi)

The Sulawesi Forest Turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi) is a critically endangered reptile species in Indonesia. The reptile abounds only in the Sulawesi in Indonesia. The turtle is characterized by a flat brown carapace. The female’s head appears as dark brown with parts of yellow while the male’s head is entirely yellow. The male grows to 28 centimeters, while females are smaller at 24 centimeters. The turtle inhabits both land and water and blends well with the environment. The turtles’ population has been on a decline in Sulawesi due to capture by humans for delicacy and trade. There is yet to be a major conservation initiative for the turtle.

Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis)

The Komodo Dragon is the largest and heaviest lizard species in the world. It is also one of the few venomous lizards. The dragon inhabits five Indonesian Islands, namely Komodo, Flores, Padar, Rinca, and Gili Motang. Males can grow up to 3 meters while females grow to a maximum of 1.8 meters. The dragon feeds on mammals, birds, and invertebrates. Deer, carrion, water buffalo, small dragons and even humans are some of its typical prey.

The Komodo dragon is characterized by a large muscular tail, and its appearance ranges from black to yellow-gray in color. The Komodo mainly roams in the day when the heat is extreme and digs burrows to rest in at night. The species is listed as Vulnerable, and it is chiefly conserved in the Komodo National Park.

Forsten’s Tortoise (Indotestudo forstenii)

The Forsten’s Tortoise only inhabits the Indonesian Islands of Sulawesi and Halmahera. The tortoise grows to a maximum of 10 inches, and the female is more rounded and wider than the male. The shell of the tortoise ranges in color from caramel to yellowish-brown with spots of black although other tortoises appear caramel or black entirely. The male is identified by a concave plastron while that of the female is flat. In regards to diet, the tortoise is omnivorous and feeds on carrion, leafy greens, worms, fruits and slugs. The tortoise is tolerant of arid conditions and is most active before sunset and before dawn. The species is listed as Vulnerable due to decreased populations.

Japanese Pit Viper (Trimeresurus puniceus)

The Japanese Pit Viper (Trimeresurus puniceus) is a poisonous species of snake. The snake grows to an average of 45 to 81 centimeters. The snake’s head appears black or dark-brown with gray or beige sides. The snake’s body ranges from a pale, yellow-brown or reddish-brown background overlaid with a network of lateral blotches. The snake inhabits marshes, rocks, swamps and meadows and mainly feeds on rodents alongside small insects and birds. No major threats to the species have been identified.

Threats to Indonesia's Reptiles

Other native reptiles of Indonesia include the Singalang keelback, the Sulawesi bloodsucker, the Biaro flying dragon, the Seram Bow-fingered Gecko, the Bengkulu Reed Snake, and the Black-Shouldered Tree Agama. Environmental threats such as habitat loss and poaching continue to threaten the poorly protected native reptiles of Indonesia.

Native Reptiles Of Indonesia

Native Reptiles of IndonesiaBinomial Scientific Name
Singalang Keelback
Rhabdophis akraios
Sulawesi Bloodsucker
Bronchocela celebensis
Javanese Pit Viper
Trimeresurus puniceus
Biaro Flying Dragon
Draco biaro
Sulawesi Forest Turtle
Leucocephalon yuwonoi
Seram Bow-fingered Gecko
Cyrtodactylus nuaulu
Bengkulu Reed Snake
Calamaria alidae
Black-Shouldered Tree Agama
Calotes nigriplicatus
Komodo Dragon
Varanus komodoensis
Forsten's Tortoise
Indotestudo forstenii

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